TRUMP ADMINISTRATION U.S. Travel Ban Sparks Backlash in Europe

The governments of Britain, France and Germany have all come out in opposition to U.S. President Donald Trump’s travel ban against citizens of several Muslim-majority countries, amid concern that dual nationals could be affected.
Quelle: dpa
President Donald Trump's travel ban for people from seven countries sparked anger worldwide.
(Source: dpa)

U.S. President Donald Trump’s executive order banning the entry of citizens from seven Muslim-majority countries to the United States met with widespread criticism in Germany and Europe.

Chancellor Angela Merkel expressed her regret over the immigration order during a telephone conversation with Mr. Trump on Saturday, according to government spokesman Steffen Seibert.

Ms. Merkel said “she is convinced that the necessary fight against terrorism does not justify placing people of a particular origin or belief under general suspicion,” according to Mr. Seibert.

If the United States doesn’t immediately lift this crazy travel ban for parliamentarian Omid Nouripour and other German nationals, Donald Trump should be denied entry for the G20 summit in Hamburg. Dieter Janeck, Spokesman, Green Party

Mr. Trump criticized Ms. Merkel’s liberal immigration policy as a “catastrophic mistake” in a recent interview with European press. The chancellor’s coalition government opened Germany’s borders in 2015 to a million migrants and refugees, many of whom were fleeing war in the Middle East.

In December, a Tunisian migrant who was denied asylum in Germany drove a truck in to a Christmas market in Berlin, killing a dozen people. He had declared allegiance to Islamic State.

In the face of a mounting global backlash, the U.S. president has defended his immigration order in a Twitter message, saying the United States needs strong borders and describing Europe as a “horrible mess.”



The three-month travel ban applies to people from Syria, Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen. Mr. Trump has also suspended the Syrian refugee resettlement program indefinitely.

The order sparked protests at airports across the United States, where between 100 and 200 people were stranded in transit zones. A federal judge in New York issued an order halting the deportation of travelers if they had already arrived in the United States with valid visas.

German government spokesman Mr. Seibert said Berlin would “now review what consequences the measures of the U.S. government have on German nationals with dual citizenship and represent their interest to our American partners.”

The opposition Green Party has called for consequences in response to Mr. Trump’s immigration order, which has affected the parliamentarian Omid Nouripour, a dual German-Iranian citizen. Mr. Nouripour is the vice chair of the German-American parliamentary group.

“If the United States doesn’t immediately lift this crazy travel ban for parliamentarian Omid Nouripour and other German nationals, Donald Trump should be denied entry for the G20 summit in Hamburg,” Dieter Janeck, spokesman for the Greens, told Handelsblatt.

And when he refuses the arrival of refugees, while Europe has done its duty, we have to respond. Francois Hollande, French President

Outgoing French President Francois Hollande has also called for Europe to issue a “firm” response to Mr. Trump’s immigration order and his trade policies.

"When he adopts protectionist measures, which could destabilize economies not just in Europe but the economies of the main countries of the world, we have to respond,” Mr. Hollande told a gathering of southern European leaders on Saturday. "And when he refuses the arrival of refugees, while Europe has done its duty, we have to respond.”

British Prime Minister Theresa May has ordered her foreign and home secretaries to raise the travel ban with their counterparts in the Trump administration amid concern that British dual nationals could be denied entry to the United States.

Foreign Minister Boris Johnson called the travel ban divisive.



Ms. May has sought to cultivate close ties to the Trump administration in the hope of hammering out a bilateral trade deal with the United States in the wake of Britain’s decision to leave the European Union. She was the first foreign leader to meet with Mr. Trump in Washington.

A petition in the United Kingdom to cancel Mr. Trump’s state visit has reached more than 100,000 signatures.

 

Spencer Kimball is an editor for Handelsblatt Global based in the U.S. To contact the author: [email protected]